Adverse events should be reported

If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in the package leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard. By reporting side effects you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.

Reporting forms and information can be found at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.

Adverse events should also be reported to Mylan by phone: 0800 121 8267 or by email: ukpharmacovigilance@mylan.com

Up to 77% of patients make mistakes using pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDI)9

Have you checked your inhaler technique recently?

Do you press the canister at the right time?

Are you coordinating your breathing properly?

Do you hold your breath for 10 seconds after inhalation?

Did you know that inhaler technique can deteriorate over time?

If you’ve been using an inhaler for at least two to three months there’s a chance you’ve begun to slip into bad habits.10 Think about your inhaler technique – are you possibly making some or all of the most common errors? For example:

  • Are you breathing out as far as possible before use?
  • Are you co-ordinating breathing in with pressing the canister?
  • Are you breathing the medication in at the right speed?

Why is good inhaler technique important?

There are many reasons why good inhaler technique is essential but perhaps the most important is that good technique means your asthma is more effectively controlled.

Poor inhaler technique means:10

  • The medication won’t get from your inhaler into your lungs properly
  • Too little or too much of each drug will be released from the inhaler
  • Less of your asthma medication will reach the right places in your lungs
  • Your asthma may not be well controlled
  • You may need to use your rescue inhaler often
  • The risk of emergency treatment increases
  • Medication is wasted

Good inhaler technique means:10

  • The medication will get from the inhaler to your lungs properly
  • The right combination of drugs will be released from the inhaler
  • You’ll get the right amount of medication to the right places in the lungs
  • Inflammation caused by asthma should be kept under control
  • Your symptoms should be managed well
  • You may need to use your rescue inhaler rarely
  • Medication is not wasted

Spot the error

How’s your form?

Take this quick quiz and see if you can spot some common mistakes

While you're completing this quick quiz think about your inhaler technique and see if you can spot areas where you might need to improve.

Question %QuestionNumber% of 5

  1. How should you prepare your inhaler when using for the first time?

    Choose one answer.

  2. Before using your inhaler every time, you should…

    Choose all that apply.

  3. What is the correct positioning during an inhalation?

    Choose one answer.

  4. When should you press the canister?

    Choose one answer.

  5. Why is it important to hold your breath for 10 seconds or for as long as you can after inhaling your medication?

    Choose one answer.

Check your technique

With the right information and practice, inhalation errors can be easily fixed.

Have a look at these quick inhalation techniques – each one is designed to help you use your inhaler in the best way possible.

Shake it

Your inhaler should be shaken before every use

If the contents of the canister, both propellant and medication, are not mixed thoroughly, then too much or too little of one component will be released.

Not shaking the canister properly can lead to inconsistent dosing and a poorly functioning inhaler.

Use the slider to shake the canister and see why its important to shake your inhaler before use.

In and out

Bring awareness to your breathing

Breathing out fully (or as much as is comfortable) reduces the amount of air in the airways and increases the available space for air from the next breath.

The result is a deeper than normal inhalation, maximising the opportunity to carry all of the medication to the site of action.

Push the button

Pressing the canister down at the right time is essential

The time between pressing the canister and the final part of the medication leaving the inhaler device is less than half a second.

Any delay between pressing the canister and starting to breathe in means that lung deposition is significantly reduced, as the aerosol has already been released.

Press the canister as you breathe in

Steady on

You should breathe in at a slow speed and hold your breath after the puff

By keeping the air still for a few seconds, a greater amount of medication can settle and start working in the lungs.

A 10-second breath hold is thought to be ideal, but if this is not possible, hold your breath after inhaling for as long as is comfortable.

0

After taking a slow, steady and deep breath, test yourself for how many seconds you can hold your breath.

If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in the package leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard. By reporting side effects you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.

Reporting forms and information can be found at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.

Adverse events should also be reported to Mylan by phone: 0800 121 8267 or by email: ukpharmacovigilance@mylan.com