Adverse events should be reported

If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in the package leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard. By reporting side effects you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.

Reporting forms and information can be found at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.

Adverse events should also be reported to Mylan by phone: 0800 121 8267 or by email: ukpharmacovigilance@mylan.com

1 in 12 adults live with asthma in the UK4

Asthma can cause symptoms like coughing and wheezing5

If you don’t use your asthma inhaler properly or regularly symptoms can get worse5

Asthma symptoms can be triggered by a number of things, including allergies and exercise5

Asthma attacks can be scary and can put you in a life-threatening situation4

Who’s at risk?

Asthma can appear at any age; symptoms usually start during childhood but it’s not uncommon for adults to develop asthma.6

In fact, around 4.3 million adults are currently receiving treatment for asthma in the UK.4

What causes asthma?

We still don’t know exactly what causes asthma so we can’t yet predict who might be at risk. But we do know that a combination of reasons are likely to be the cause, rather than just one.6

Possible causes of asthma include:

Personal causes e.g.

  • A family history of asthma or allergies
  • Premature birth or low birth weight
  • Having bronchiolitis (a common lung infection) as a child
  • You have eczema or another allergic condition such as hay fever

Environmental causes e.g.

  • Air pollution such as traffic fumes
  • Exposure to certain substances at work
  • Spending time around smokers

What ‘triggers’ asthma symptoms?

An asthma trigger is something that starts your asthma symptoms or makes them worse. Asthma triggers are different for many people and can include:6

Allergens

– including pollen, dust mites, animal fur

Weather conditions

– including sudden temperature changes, cold air, humidity

Exercise

Infections

– particularly of the upper airways

Airborne irritants

– including cigarette smoke, fumes, pollution

Indoor conditions

– including mould or damp and chemicals in carpets

Food allergies

Once you’ve worked out your asthma triggers, try to avoid them as much as possible to help control your asthma.

Tips and advice

Asthma can’t be cured but there are things you can do to help control it. Take a look at these top tips for staying in control of your asthma:

Take your treatment

It’s very important not to miss a day of your treatment. Regular use your inhaler is essential for treating the inflammation caused by asthma.

Go for a check-up

Chat with your doctor regularly to discuss your medication and needs.

Stay healthy

Make sure you exercise regularly, eat healthily and get vaccinated. If you smoke, try quitting and if you don’t, try to avoid spending time around smokers.

Know when to act

Your inhaler helps to stop breathlessness and wheeziness coming on. However if you have a sudden attack of breathlessness or wheezing you should use a fast-acting ‘rescue’ inhaler.

Further information about asthma and treatment

Get an Asthma Action Plan

Many people with asthma benefit from an Asthma Action Plan. This is a plan that helps you keep well with your asthma and should be completed with your GP or asthma nurse.8 You can download a copy here.

Your plan should contain all the information you need to look after your asthma, including information on your treatment, any triggers you’ve identified and what to do in an emergency.

Have regular check-ups

You should also have regular check-ups about your asthma with your doctor where they should review your symptoms and treatment and check your inhaler technique. You can also check your inhaler technique here.

If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in the package leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard. By reporting side effects you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.

Reporting forms and information can be found at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.

Adverse events should also be reported to Mylan by phone: 0800 121 8267 or by email: ukpharmacovigilance@mylan.com